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Some Simple Dessert Decoration

Make it creative as a painting

There are many ways to compose a plate. Think about the plate as if it is a blank canvas or as if you were composing the frame for a photograph. Adding totally different textures to the plate adds excitement to the visual charm of course. To illustrate, you could make some meaningful drawings suiting the theme of the party with your candy pieces over the topping of the cake.

Contrast temperatures

There is nothing like pairing a slice of warm pie or a fruit tart with a cool scoop of frozen dessert. Combining temperatures are often easy; however plating will need some thought. Don’t place your course on a hot plate. Frozen dessert can soften too quickly. A chilled plate could also be useful once plating cold desserts, whereas hot ones can just do fine for many cakes or pies.

Create a focal point

Using an element in your dessert as a focal point can help give your plating focus. Just like any other centerpiece, it should be one that fits and blends well with the overall presentation of the course. Remember, the centerpiece will be the focal point of the dessert so you need to invest a good amount of time and energy into planning for one that will attract your dessert. Some nice ideas embody an outsized chocolate fountain, a transparent jar crammed with fruits, ice sculpture etc.

Garnishing desserts

Think about the eater once adding finishing touches to your plate. Keep in mind how the garnish will function on the finished plate. Garnishing your desserts with chocolate curls, Cocoa powder/icing sugar, berries, dried fruits, mint leaves, fruit slices and nuts adds a touch of glam to your desserts.

Be consistent

When plating desserts for a crowd, be consistent in your style and in serving size. It is often confusing to see totally different presentation on every plate, and no-one likes to see the plate across the table with a serving double the dimensions.